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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
katrina were not broken. they were people who had worked and had homes and paid taxes. so today, madam speaker, those who are survivors of hurricane sandy are not broken. they are not the cornerstone of the fault of bureaucracy or misuse. they are in fact survivors. they are americans who need our help. and i'd like to add to this discussion, certainly i join and want to comment on one or two of the changes here. in particular the individual assistance factors i think will be very helpful to expedite the declaration process for individuals. i'm very grateful that one of the changes they made, thank goodness, and this is what happened to our seniors, fixing their homes instead of putting them in fema trailers. what a celebration. how many had to stay in fema trailers down in the gulf forever and ever and ever while they watched their homes deteriorate because a few simple repairs could not be made? that is a much-needed step. but i join my colleague from new jersey and say, how can people who are broken and who are in need come up with 35%? and i hope that this will be one that is recon
for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it
and the issues we deal with in the coast and trying to tie that to the tax base and relate that both from a local regional perspective but also a national perspective. when you look at it, 30% of this nation's g.d.p. comes from the gulf coast. you look at the population increase we've had. since 1970, there has been 109% increase in the gulf coast region. the people are there, the vulnerabilities are there but also it is significant to what it provides to the nation. from the states perspective and also from the gulf we recognize that healthy ecosystems also can mean healthy economies. from louisiana, what we have taken -- what we believe is a very good first effort the addressing the vulnerabilities that exist in reducing that risk is with the state's matter of fact plan which is a long- term plan to reduce the economic significance and reduce the risk across the coast. we believe we can achieve protection for all coastal communities. it is that resource that is important. the states provide and the gulf provides to the nation, it if it is going to be afforded through the nation. we believe with
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3